Think & Grow Rich Lessons
James Lombard Dublin, Leinster, Ireland

Posted: 2016-02-24

Ctrl/Cmd+V                                                                                   The Six Ghosts of Fear

 

 

Let’s begin with a quote from Plato: “The first and best victory is to conquer self”. It follows from this that one must know oneself and this is not easy, as it can make us experience unpleasant feelings. Hill’s perspective is: “Before you can put any portion of this philosophy into successful use, your mind must be prepared to receive it.  ………… It begins with the study, analysis, and understanding of three enemies which you will have to clear out – indecision, doubt and fear”. He counsels going rigorously through a checklist of very personal questions in order to arrive at the truth. Implied in all of this, is the suggestion that unless you know your fears and you focus your self-talk on eliminating them, you will not be totally successful in developing a successful mind-set.

 

Fears imprison the real you; you could call it the soul or spirit. Imagine your soul entombed in a mine hundreds of feet below ground, and in order to free it you have to drill down into the hard rock. Hill says: “Before we can master an enemy, we must know its name, its habits, and its place of abode. As you read, analyse yourself carefully and determine which, if any, of the six common fears have attached themselves to you”. So, self-examination is critical.

 

The process of reading this chapter again has been very rewarding: I have discovered that the major habit holding me back is shyness. Let’s analyse this concept for a moment. Someone has said that it is a case of – Don’t let you discover me – an attitude that is a typical trait of a green personality. For me,it manifests itself especially in public places among strangers, in the form of a fear of making eye contact or being afraid to strike up a conversation. It also signifies, I contend, that I feel  unworthy of attention. This comes under the category of the fear of criticism. It could also come under the heading of poverty, feeling that one is less talented than others. Hill indicates this when he says: “The word- riches- is here used in its broadest sense, meaning financial, spiritual, mental and material estates”.

 

The first key to a solution for this condition occurred to me when I tuned in to this Monday’s Leaders' Skills Call, when Michael Dlouhy said that the antidote to fear and danger is “Trust”, trust in oneself and trust in others. I believe that by displaying fear in the presence of others we give off vibrations of fear which are returned to us in the form of negative emotions. Hill states: “Even a dog or a horse will pick up the vibrations of fear thrown off by its master, and behave accordingly”. I feel that saying my self-talk based on my definite purpose, while visualizing myself sending out positive vibrations and people reacting positively to me, is the best way of conquering my fear. Bringing the - Five Steps to Self-confidence - included in the chapter on desire into my daily routine is also important. Meanwhile, regular careful scrutiny of the - Think Before You Answer - checklist will be my priority. This may reveal other hidden fears or illuminate the one already discovered.

 

                                                                                                                                                                                               Regards and best wishes to all.

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                           James Lombard, Dublin, Ireland.